Black Boomers: No Magic to Weight Loss

Closeup of an older woman wearing a blue sports bra and watch : Free Stock Photo

One of my students presented me with a watch-like gadget.

“What is this?” I asked her

“It is to help you track your steps.  10,000 steps each day to keep you fit.”

A few days later my friend called me.  She was walking home from the train station trying to complete her targeted steps for that day.  Many persons are using technological devices to help lose weight and get into shape.  As I take my daily walk/jog, I see these fitness trackers on the arms and wrists of persons trying to get fit.  Some people swear that the gadgets help them in their goals to be fit.  I often questioned about those 10,000 steps.  It is like drinking eight glasses of water a day.  Good to do, but who is to say that more or less may not be just as effective.

A new study about weight loss and fitness trackers has indicated that technology alone does not aid in weight loss.  The two-year study compared standard behavioral weight loss interventions such as diet, exercise, tips, and counseling with the addition of fitness trackers.  The results indicated that adding a fitness device tracker did not make a significant difference.  It looks great wearing a tracker on your wrist or arm.  However, moderation and consistency in the diet are still the basics of weight loss goals.

Is there a place for technology such as fitness trackers in the battle of the bulge?  I believe that these devices can play an important role in helping persons to become motivated to achieve their goals.  However, this technology is not magic.  Those persons who are trying to lose weight must commit to healthy lifestyle changes that help to promote and sustain their weight management goals.

 

JAMA. 2016;316(11):1161-1171. doi:10.1001/jama.2016.12858.

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